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representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on here. we want to promote that. innovation is difficult because by definition,
to i think i think this is where we need to work this out. we're not going out and educating businesses right now. the likelihood you'll by looking at the bigger side of our business >> director i believe if more than your business is one second for it will be taxed at a different rate and i make everything i sell. so i'm making it and selling it. right but you're also whole sailing >> yeah, but wholesale and retail are in the same bracket. by definition the - so i look like a retailer but i'm a manufacturer if you proportion the dollars >> well, is your margin bigger than air manufacturing costs it will be interesting to find out how they find this. >> look by definition your whole sailing it and selling it. >> not every manufacture will have a manufacturer presence. >> yeah, so this is - anyway pointing out. >> again we're not going out and promoting this yet base we're still talking about this and there will be an awe apportionment but they'll be some guidelines on. >> i have a question. saying there is a small business exemption for gross receipts less than one million but o
district titles four, seven and nine of the indian education act. she has moved beyond the limits of her duties for the families in her district. she spends time volunteers for all community functions that the alliance puts on. the families that she serves remember her fondly and all that she did for them. she offered her talents to powwows, food booths, graduations and dinners and let's watch a video on gwen stirrer. >> i am [inaudible] known as the keepers of the western door. they're on the western side of new york and they're the biggest of the tribes. i'm the one -- i'm the one that creeks that runs through our reservation now. indian community -- there was nothing in the beginning. for 20 years that i work in the school district helping the children understand that their heritage was important, and important to be proud of being indian, and so that gave them reasons to study harder and to be a better student and stay in school. where you come from is important and what your background is and your family, so we have to have indian education. i don't think i'm a hero. i just
you. thank you. >> where do began. no matter whether you know about education or not, let's turn to the banking world. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment, and we know that because the first three years of life for the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time, and i think there must be an incident or a toddler in here, which brings me to the next point, yes we have class warfare, but it is unusual class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out. it is a bipartisan effort to keep people who are pouring out of the national dialogue. that is why i started witness to hunter, which is working to be able to provide direction testimony on their experiences on raising children in poverty, and i will tell you there are so many conversations. the fact people have been silent for so many years, that is a mass of a trail. the first thing the women who are poor will tell you is that poverty is solvable. they e
to balance california's budget. he also pushed for his priorities including education and regulatory reform. now, john, how would you rate his speech and what left the biggest impressions on you? >> well, you know, rating the speech, a speech from jerry brown is really tough to do because it's unlike any other speech you get from any other governor. how many governors go from the book of genesis to "the little engine that could" in one 25-minute speech? this was a vintage jerry brown speech. i think really what you saw here was a little bit of the governor running a victory lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lot of brown history facts. and really a message i think not only to the legislature but to the public of, like, i'm watching it. we're going to be careful, but we're going to move forward. >> and, john, yo
at the streets. the count 30 it is. >> want spending solution is improving education. just friday, a city funded university cut nearly 100 positions from its staff and faculty to actually save money. another top suggestion is refunding the money. >> that might help the economy. give the people a refund and they will spend the money. that will keep some people higher at and boost people a little bit. >> you don't have to go far to see someone in need. 15,000 people are homeless in d.c., including about 1000 families. >> there's a lot of homeless people year. >> here is the city council wish list -- topping it, homeless services welfare programs, and education for $9.5 billion. tomorrow, we should know more about the budget surplus. the city's chief financial officer will release the annual report and we might hear more from the mayor and city council as to what their ideas are. >> thank you. still to come, college graduates are being hit especially hard right now when it comes to finding work and their education could be the problem. >> taking a live look outside, we're lookin
to acknowledge the noe valley merchants' association for their exemplary commitment to education and assist businesss in noe valley on disability access requirements. the noe valley merchants' the association understands that continued disability outreach and education is about maintaining the economic preservation of their merchant corridor and it is the only merchants association in san francisco that has established a standing committee to develop comprehensive outreach -- excuse me. that establishes a standing committee and developed a comprehensive outreach and education program and assist businesses that are in pre-and post-litigation. the small business commission commends the noe valley merchants association as an outstanding merchants association not only for their dedication to the businesss in their districts, but also for being a strong citywide and statewide voice for businesses and individuals with disabilities around the issue of disability access compliance. so thank you. [ applause ] so i just have a few other notes. is that the noe valley merchants association has made th
to continue their education. middle school to college today we'll talk about some of the programs that help students stay in school. first, the dropout rate for oakland's unified district was 26.6%. that is higher than the national average. joining us to talk about is the numbers and with a administrators is doing about is the spokesperson, is troy flint. >> thanks for having me. >> cheryl: 26.6%, you must be doing a lot to address the issues? >> it's one of the most critical issues. districts across the country particularly urban districts. there is no one comprehensive solution. we're attacking it from null of angle that has address the social components that gets kids disenchanted with schools. >> cheryl: you have a different population in schools especially as they progress? >> we are predominantly low income district, 70% of our students qualify for free lunch program. as you elementary to middle, it increases. poverty is a factor in some of these negative outcomes but it shouldn't be did he term in an event. that is determinant. so that is why we are drying trying a address these issu
it was. education has moved on hugely. i think in terms of the progress to the things we would understand, and there has been a momentum. it has progressed to an extraordinary way. >> the taliban had not gone away. soon afghan security forces will have to fight them on their own. the man who led the intelligence war for most of the last 10 years said the attacks are set to get worse. >> it reduces this. the taliban are going to change their tactics. they are going to modify their strategy. there are going to do more and more spectacular attacks. >> like this one on our first morning in cobble, a triple suicide bombing. officials told us on average there are four such attacks for every week. we went to see what security was like. here the government is offering them money to give up guns and reintegrate themselves into village communities. it is having mixed results. >> the man behind me were told the problem we have is no means of knowing. even if they are, the numbers are so very small. to 6000 integrating. >> the details are registered diametrically. while we were there, at a ballmer ki
education about half the price of what is normal. we'll tell you how they do it, coming up. ♪ david: according to a report released today by the national retail federation, retail sales are expected to rise 3.4% in 2013. this looks good but this is significantly lower than the 4.2% growth in 2012. cheryl: higher payroll raises and coming fiscal cliff drama expected to weigh on the consumer spending but he says outlook looks pretty bright. he says he was named a rising star in wall street research by institutional investors. congratulations. on that. luxury took a bit of a hit in 2012. the sector overall, we saw the middle tier players jumping back in. why do you say luxury will come back this year once again? >> i'm excited about it. the market stablized to a certain extent. we're seeing better performance above $500 price points. there is enthusiasm am and the rich continue to be riff. david: talk about the high-end with tiffany. we mentioned tiffany before. this is one of the best brands in the world. you men's the name tiffany, is almost a word in of itself. some people complaine
, a federal education department, and they drug war. the voters they do something. that's why i wrote my book, "no, they can't." as we begin, what can we do it we disagree with president obama's big government vision? mark meckler and starlee rhoades has some ideas. they have the citizens for self-governance. starlee rhoades is president of the goldwater institute. both say we can return power to the states. what do you mean? start with obamacare. >> state should establish health insurance exchanges. twenty-five states said go right ahead, the policy on your own. you will have to implement it on your own watch. it protects and stops massive subsidies from being paid out from insurance companies and it protects people from being told on by the irs. john: the exchange is a place where you go on the web and it helps you buy an insurance policy. he insurance does that at no cost to the taxpayer. i don't know why it has to be such a big deal or cost so much. >> that is what the federal government will do, and extinction each day. but the thing that is great about that policy change is having the f
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
. that there is one more thing. so the educational system in college. i think there should be services for financial aid for individuals with disabilities. as you are abruptly thrown into the world with lots of action going on and it's a very hard transition. particularly if you are furthering your education, for folks with disabilities, particularly with financial aid. this is why most individuals don't go to college. that is all, thank you. >> thank you. are there any council members who have a comment or question? go ahead idell. >> thank you. thank you everyone for coming out here today. i have to apologize, i have been sick, so i didn't even know that the meeting would have happened. i would have had a lot more people here. sorry about that, but the next time we do this, which i know this won't be last one, it will be go. what i wanted to say is having access -- she was talking about the internet -- having cable or something at a reasonable price. we have people with disabilities and seniors just siting this their house just looking at wall because they cannot afford cable or a telephone
, and she find it too tough. and she probably decided that education is the right way to go. i don't know if they are going to stick together very long. she has a dream and i think that's wonderful. and she has a courage to make the dream come true. and going to college definitely going to help her to make her dream come true. i think that's wonderful. kevin, i can write my songs on a computer. they have a computer lab. it opens up the possibilities of song composition... what's the possibility of getting some food in this house soon? i'm going grocery shopping tomorrow. put what you want on the list. i can't believe how many forms i have to fill out. i can't believe we're out of cereal. put it on the list. o.k. rebecca... casey. 1097 e street. apartment number 3. boston, mass. 02168. we're almost out of peanut butter. i just bought that jar. hey, look, a coupon. two for the price of one. just... i know-- put it on the list. phone number. (617) 686-7731. age: 28. father: patrick casey. mother: margaret casey, deceased. we should get more cookies. ( sighs ) gee, they want to know everythin
children to read can sometimes be a difficult task but one school developed a fun and education hallway to make reading fun. our education reporter sherrie johnson introduces us to boys, books and basketball. >> look at this shirt. it's a great shirt. >> reporter: it's 8 a.m. at steven forest elementary school in columbia. school doesn't start for another 45 minutes but the library is packed with fourth and fifth grade boils. it's part of the program that's a book club for selected boys who need a boost in reading and confidence. >> the more you a read, the -- you read, the better you can spell. >> reporter: they alternate book club discussions one week and basketball the next book. after the book discussion, it as time to hit the courts. school data shows males are falling behind female students in reading. this program is turning things around. >> it's a gel it make them lifelong leaders, not just this year, but i want them to learn to love reading. as they leave us and go into middle and high school, i want them to continue to pick up books. >> reporter: they help one another and for
education to their business clients. we had 13 applications for getting assistance to go forward and getting a first walk through and getting an assessment for access abilility. we'll all pleased with this. i'm sure more about come through. and then small business saturday november 30th of 2013 we're going to be starting this earlier with the american express and is chamber to start planning for that. and then the retreat is february 26th is it? or excuse me. . february 25th. and so as i mentioned i will be meeting with president adams to work on the agenda but also will be reaching out to each one of the commissioners to talk to you about the retreat and what you would like to see worked on. legislation wise are having a quiet legislative - not much legislation has been introduced. next meeting you will be hearing is tobacco register restriction. we're going to get a presentation about clove restrictive ice areas. there are several throughout this community and you'll be able to hear with the alcohol restrict areas. and then the c r v the outreach committee will be reviewing the. draft an
that americans are too educated to do. >> susie: so what does this mean for your, the group that you represent, there are many small businesses. they hire a lot of less skills immigrants. is this going to help or hurt them. is it going to create more competition for those small businesses? >> no, those, the employers i represent desperately want a legal way to hire low-skilled workers. they're running restaurants. they're running food processing operations, they're running hotels and they face a choice right now. they hire workers and they run them through the system but they're never sure if those cards are accurate or not. whether the system is really accurate. they want ways to hire legal immigrants so that they're not putting their businesses at riskment and ideally this will offer that, both by legalizing people already here but also creating a line for workers to come in in the future, a pipeline for legal, low skilled workers to enter the country. >> how do they feel about this framework, a lot of new rules will come into play here, employee verification papers, things like that. what,
deserves an excellent education. it should not be predetermined by what your parents or providers, socioeconomic status is and whether you can afford to pay the exorbitant bills for private schools. they are not cheap. ronin was in public school but there are so many kids in the class i think one day they lost the little guy. you have don't stand out. if you need extra help it's difficult to get it. great teachers, mean well, but they are challenged by the numbers. you go to private school but who is able to afford that? some schools are financial aid assistance there. has to be an alternative that you don't the children educationmly discriminated against because they can't afford a $45,000 or $60,000 school. >> dana: that is a great point. the way you put it in terms of being discriminated against. we're from d.c. but i moved up here and you have a place up there, bob. one of the programs the school choice program in d.c., voucher program, very popular amongst a lot of people. ended under president obama and john boehner got it back in. do you think the unions are nervous with th
said, i'm going to do it in health care, education and energy. now think about that, health care is one-sixth, and then you control the production and the price and you control everything and he tried to with cap and trade but failed. and education is the future. you control the three elements there and you've goten what lennon would call the commanding heights of a post industrial society. that's what he said he wanted to do. but you don't remember this because unlike me, you have real lives, you don't have to watch everything the man says, i do for my sins and they clearly are many, but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase, the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered, but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech when they give out the printed version of it was called the new foundation. he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appalachian, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ide
work within our community to educate people about issues of humanitarian aid and world need. and as we raise our community's consciousness, we fund and we raise funds to support relief efforts all around the world. our projects focus on, education, hunger, safe drinking water, and disaster relief, and all kinds of different ways of helping people. we have ongoing projects in cambodia, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bi
on education and awareness but it's not enough. we need direct services. we need to raise our voices and bush congress and let them know that the united states must recommit to putting resources to ending trafficking. and comprehensive immigration reform. and statewide. we should continue to fight for legislation like the domestic worker to live rights of other things that promote marginalization of our clients. at the end of the day and work with survivors we need to understand and listen and let them know that the work goes on. i want to thank -- a personal mentor. she has really been a mentor; she challenges us and says we are not powerless. what about ...? that is the question we should always ask ourselves. thank you. (applause) >> thank you again to mayor ed lee who has to leave and catch a plane. thank you. (applause) now i would like to call on supervisor carmen chu who has been fantastic and is been really outspoken; she has spoken so often and so well. it is a pleasure to have you here. >> supervisor chu: i want to thank nancy, and the department, and the commission. i want
republic has achieved far more progress outcomes in alleviating poverty, health care, providing educational access and expanding opportunities for women in the shah's regime aggregate. hillary and i are happy to go into this morning q&a if you like, let me give you a couple examples of what i'm talking about. the islamic republic has developed a hope your system that is greatly increase and reduce infant and child mentality in iran. the provision of health care to rural areas has been particularly impressive since the revolution. the islamic republic is basically equalized outcomes in urban and rural setting in a knot or which is really quite extraordinary in an international context. get this. there are no iranian doctors and public health specialists working with state university and ngos state of mississippi to introduce iranian styled rural health care delivery into medically underserved parts of the mississippi delta. the islamic republic is also greatly expanded educational opportunities with letter series and basically eliminating gender disparity in educational access. one facet of
to have the children they want, to educate the children they had and keep them safe. so it really has to do with, how do we define women in our society? are they full and equal participants? and the best way, the seemingly sort of neutral way of undermining their personhood, is to focus on the issue of abortion. >> for us, our slogan is "health, dignity, and justice." and when you think about compulsory pregnancies, it's taking away health, dignity, and justice from a woman. many of the women, the latinas that we work with that have experienced abortion are in their 20s, have a child already, and are -- >> and why do they want an abortion? >> because they're not in an economic situation they -- >> they can't afford a second child? >> they perhaps can't afford a second child, they want to go to school, they might be at a point in their career. the reasons range, quite frankly. it's really important that women that we work with, mostly latina, immigrant, women of color, those at the margins, low income, are able to access their rights in a way without barriers and further bureaucratic o
concerned about, people are concerned about health care costs and education costs. and to a lesser extent, when economic growth is stronger as it was later in the bush years maybe they're concerned about issues related to the bottom and so. education and health care and sort of the broader challenge of globalization, those things loom incredibly large and the republican imagination and those are not issues republicans like to talk about. this is where compassion conservatism didn't emerge any backing to emerge in the late 1990s from a period when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington for four, six years. and the whole point of bush's him was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. that's something to say about health care. you can go back and said, i think justifiably, that something like the prescription drugs bill was too big, cost too much, should've bee been paid fn someone been paid for and so wanted you to make similar critiques with no child left behind by the republican party will never get back to the wilderness if it ju
. they were people who had higher education's and they actually travel the world and learn from other cultures. the constitution was written by men who had studied the government's through history and other countries and picking and choosing from the various things that they saw describing the things they felt didn't work and coming up with creative solutions for the issues they thought hadn't been resolved by others. more people are voting now than they had in past years because of worries me when the citizens for debt that it is their obligation not to let the country just happened, but to create a the country that they want. they tell me how did you feel about immigration lollies, the immigration law, how do you feel about the debate on the amendment and there are always questions like that would be called i generally have the cases i am still considering our that we have made up our mind because i haven't. but if i express an opinion, that is what they will believe. having said that what you can say to them is why are you asking me? why aren't you asking yourself? what do you think? and wh
are overeducated for the jobs that are available but not educated for the jobs that are open? >> we have had this problem probably for the last two to three 24 or five years where people are running now the cost of a college education is worth it in the long run because the jobs that are available are not the middle-market job. every highly professional jobs or the hourly jobs. we run call centers and folks taking phone calls, it is certainly not what they probably intended to do. melissa: every job is a great job, more power to you. this entire affair settled with the kind of college debt you thought would bring with it a higher paying job and you now can afford to make student loan payments, it is not a great thing. are you hiring right now? are you looking for folks? >> quite frankly kind of candidates i received just aren't qualified. they have the wrong types of degrees. melissa: give us an example. >> if you have computer science, computer engineering, we will hire you in a split second. tons of companies we can literally start with six-figure salary out of the gate if you have web dev
artwork and its educational programs. for the youth guidance center, i just spoke about the presentation that we did for the ada transition plan. we're requesting $400,000. that is to do all the design and architectural construction drawings and obtain building permits for a $3 million project to be funded in 2014-2015. we are also requesting some funds for miscellaneous general services projects. in our master planning efforts that go on to support all of these projects, that is at the level of $400,000. and let's see, we do have some other funding requests in 2014-15. under the plan, we must plan for a two-year cycle of budget requests. and also a ten-year capital plan request. so we're looking at sun setting our funding in 2015. and it will take us through 2015, almost all the way through that year to complete the construction of all of our projects. these funding requests are separate from curb ramp and sidewalk ada transition plan funding projects. all right? so these are the architectural buildings. and that is the end of my report. >> thank you, jp. is there any public comment
schools have pledged their support for the boycott, and both the national education association and the american federation of teachers, have also given their endorsement. observers say the garfield boycott could mark a significant revolt to date against the obama administration's embrace of standardized testing. those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. and dramatic film portraying the last day of oscar grant's life won top honors at the sundance film festival. directed by first-time filmmaker, 26-year-old ryan coogler, "fruitvale" tells the story of oscar grant, the 22- year-old bay area resident who was shot to death by a bay area rapid transit police officer. the film begins with real cellphone footage of the police shooting and then dramatically retells the last hours of his life. this is a clip from the film when grant speaks with his mother about plans for new year's eve. >> you guys have plans for the night? >> nothing major. meet up with the fellows. head out to the city. >> why don't you take
how we can better use those resources not only to support public endeavors like education and public safety and roads, but also of money that could be pumped into the private sector. >> david, if you have another question or comment, we are almost at the end of our time. but we can squeeze one -- ok. i think we have not at all exhausted this topic. we may have exhausted our panelists and some of you. we will return to its. this has been -- at least for a poor country lawyer, a very enlightening discussion of the economic issues. we've not done too much with the politics. i suppose there might be a smidgen of that in some of the decisions that get made over the next month's. let me take this occasion to thank you for a plethora of wonderful questions and for hanging in there in a very difficult topic. think our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only provided us -- thank our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only providing us this topic, but great direction in shaping this program. i would like you to think -- join me in thanking our panel for a terrific discussion. [appl
was going on. >> we really understood the press s educational media media, educational tv. everything that had been going on that we were involved in had been going on 100 years. it was very hard to get out. this was 1963, i was reminded fred came to get martin luther king on the 17th of december to promise he would come to birmingham this year because on the 14th f-15 to fred's church was bombed for the third time in 1962. the bombings of homes receive no publicity. but fred was quite frank that he needed martin luther king to come to get any attention to this injustice. another good friend that was with us was a cameraman was quite blunt with me about it saying you have to cut me some slack because i've got to keep the camera on dr. king. if they kill him and i don't get a picture of it, i lose my job. it was almost that cold and analysis wear -- where martin luther king knew he was being used to focus on this injustice. and did it willingly. at the same time guys like jack nelson understood that and the cameraman was lawrence peers who had been with a friend of martin's since montg
during the darkest periods in our shared history? will the commend the work of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and a developed country and raising his find -- final issue and praising the holocaust education trust. absolutely brilliant organization that make sure young people from schools across our country get the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible events of the holocaust took place. i had privileges we could meeting with a survivor whose story was truly heroic and truly heartbreaking. but who in her 90s is still making these arguments in making this case so that future generations will and. we should also learn not just about the european holocaust but what has happened recently in rwanda, in bosnia, in cambodia and elsewhere that tragically there is far too much prejudice in our world. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, can i join the prime minister in thing to be to kingsman david robert shaw of first battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment. each of the utmost courage and bravery and the condol
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
with the municipality department of department of building inspection and also for ongoing outreach education, helping businesses in compliance with their construction-related accessibility improvements. of the dollar, $0.70 is to stay in the local municipality. $0.30 goes to the state. 5% of that $0.70 goes to administering and processing of collecting the dollar and the rest of the 65% comes back to working on inspectors and helping get inspectors become inspectors with the department of building inspection and our outreach education ongoing and helping businesses comply with the construction-related accessibility requirements. so dbi and i have started a conversation just about how we're going to be constructing working with the funds. obviously right now there is not going to be much money. we'll probably see what after may, when the business registration is due from businesses just how much the allotment will be there. and how much annually we'll be able to work with. maximum probably -- it's probably going to be in the $65,000 range per year, with the average of about 80,000 registered busine
of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and indeed the whole country in raising this vital issue, and in pleasing. praising the holocaust educational trust -- an absolutely brilliant charity an organization and makes sure that young people from schools across our country have the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible event of the holocaust took place. i had an immense privilege of meeting with a holocaust survivor whose store was truly rock and truly heartbreaking, but in her 90s, she is still making these arguments and making this case so future generations will learn. we should also learn, not just about the european holocaust, but what has happened recently in rwanda, bosnia, cambodia. >> can i join the prime minister in paying tribute to kinsman david robert schock of first battalion of the duke of lancaster is regiment? he showed the utmost courage and bravery, and the condolences of the whole house to go to his family and friends. can the prime minister guarantee that if he gets his in a eight- out referendum he will cam
opportunities to go to city college and work with our education institution so that we can better ourselves. we get child care to help us support the jobs that we need to build for our families. and i know as your kids growing up, they're going to understand these things more and more as they take up more responsibilities, right now keeping you from your brand-new bedrooms clean. [laughter] >> helping mom with the dishes, cleaning up to get your education to be the best person you want to be and go for the jobs you always wanted to have. this is the promise we have. it isn't just the physical structure. i know ms. youngblood and i know all of the people that have been invested in this dream know it for sure, that it takes a really whole community to do this. that's why we had such a great development team that came together and worked with us. john stewart, john is right here being led with his development team. we have howard here as well. you have the ridge point, which is i think the most mature of the housing managers here, ridge point's been around since '68, right? >> that's right. >> and
is in the planning stage but not approved by pentagon, the white house or niger. chicago educators learne learnee hard way. be absolutely sure about the length you send in e-mail to parents. plus, the tale of two marches and how they were covered or not covered in the media. the grapevine is next. >> bret: fox news alert. senate passed $51 billion relief bill for victims of super storm sandy. the measure passed the house two weeks ago. critics were unhappy there were no off-setting spending cuts. supporters have been pushing relief bill for weeks. the final bill vote 62-36. now -- ♪ ♪ >> bret: after that music, fresh pickings from the political grapevine. zero. that is the amount of time given to coverage of the hundreds of thousands strong marm for life. marking the 40th anniversary of the roe v. wade decision by cbs and abc evening news show friday. stories that did make the cut, hillary clinton's glasses. and the subway foot-long sub that is only 11 inches long. however, both networks did cover the other march in d.c., the pro-gun control event saturday which cbs said numbered close to 1,0
development, and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individual, and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. president obama began his second term this week with pomp, circumstance, and some prayer. in longstanding american tradition, religion had a high profile in many inaugural activities. kim lawton has more. >> reporter: before monday's public swearing-in ceremony, the obamas attended a special worship service at st. john's episcopal church. protestant, catholic and jewish leaders were part of the service, which was closed to cameras. then, the public ceremony began with an invocation by myrlie evers-williams, widow of slain civil rights leader medgar evers and the first laywoman to give an inaugural prayer. >> we invoke the prayers of our grandmothers, who taught us to pray, god, make me a blessing. >> reporter: music included the brooklyn tabernacle choir. >> the oath i have sworn before you tod
to be the first person ever to give one billion to a single u.s. institution of higher education. >>> and looking at news around the nation tonight, a man is now in jail tonight after police say he threatened to blow up the liberty bell. a arizona man started making the threats as we walked up to the bell. a little while later, police found two backpacks, the bomb squad investigated and said there were no explosives inside. the man is charged with making a terrorist tick threat, a bomb threat and several other defenses. >>> and a brazen robbery in a funeral home. the crooks got away with a tv and a hearse and left a lot of damage behind. what's worse, the owners say they took off with the vehicle, and had the nerve to bring it back. >> they moved another hearse, i don't know whether it left the premises or not, but it's not parked where we had left it. and of course they took this here, the dodge van, and they took it off site and brought it back. >> police are trying to track down the culprits tonight. >>> the west coast is getting heat tonight for not enough heat. some customers got raw chicken
, single mother, raised by a single mother. had no education. and really, no hope. and what i always say, i was lucky that i was put in front of an icon of empowerment. >> he is. every time i interview him, i feel empowered. >> that's true. what he is is an incredible educator. by the grace of the universe i was able to fall in the lap of this educator. he helped get me out of that place where i was, where there was no hope. >> he was homeless at the time. what i love about mike's story, is mike just didn't help himself. he built a small business to start with. one of the young women who worked for him was addicted to meth. how did you end up in your new business? >> the young woman had come to work for me a number of years ago. you could tell something was wrong. she was addicted to methamphetamine. she was a daily user of ecstacy. i got her involved in mr. robbins' program. within 30 day, she was completely off of drugs. it turned out her father, her dad was incredibly successful in the metal recycling business. i got a call from him shortly thereafter who said anybody who has influence o
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